Backpacking the “Little Smokies” (Part 2)

Read Part 1 first!

It was around 4 AM when I determined that the 30 degree comfort rating on my sleeping bag was woefully optimistic. We were 6 miles into a 23 mile backpacking trip at Shawnee State Forest, about 2 hours east of Cincinnati, so picking up the 0 degree bag was going to be difficult.

The temperature bottomed out right around 30, so, while I wasn’t cozy, I wasn’t facing hypothermia either. The rain fly on my double wall tent was covered in condensation, but I had stayed dry. The ultra-light single wall tent of Bill’s captured the condensation and actually filled the interior with ice crystals. Per Bill, the design worked best on dry, breezy, warm summer nights. (In other words, when you don’t really need a tent at all.)

Bring on the cold!
Bring on the cold!

After a breakfast of freeze dried sausage, potatoes and eggs (good thing I brought a lot of gorp), we started on the day’s target distance of nearly 13 miles. I warmed up fast, not so much because of the sun, but due to the climb out of the camp area of approximately 350 feet in just over a quarter mile. It was just the first of four “epic” climbs that day.

The weather turned out great with a blue sky and temperatures climbing to 60. While most of the leaves had dropped, allowing for some great views, there were still a few oaks and maples holding on to provide a splash of color.

Shawnee tree

We reached Camp 2 of the North Loop by a bit after noon, were able to refill our water bottles, and broke for lunch. Immediately after passing Camp 2 we walked into what turned out to be the toughest climb of the entire hike. In his book, “Backpacking Loops and Long Day Hikes in Southern Ohio,” Robert Runchhoft describes the hill there as an “agonizing obstacle” and the climb as “grim.” Bill and I came up with additional descriptive terms, and most of those were four letters as well. It seems the trail designers had never heard of the term switchback because nearly every hill was attacked straight up.

Thankfully, after the climb, the trail stayed on a ridge for quite a while and we were able to enjoy great views and another perfect day. We also passed by the only other people we’d see on the entire trail, two squirrel hunters and a small group day hiking near a road crossing. With an hour of daylight left, we arrived at Camp 3, which had been moved from the top of a ridge into a hollow, and uncomfortably close to State Rt. 125.

We had time to set up camp and enjoy some freeze dried pasta primavera (just like mom used to make) before darkness and the temperature fell. Colder than the previous night, the fire became less about atmosphere and more about staying warm. Climbing into the sleeping bag later, I hoped wearing pants, two pairs of socks and three shirts would lower the comfort rating of the bag to match the temperature.

Backpack tip # 273  if you are using  a flashlight that fits on the bill of a ball cap, make sure you actually bring a cap with you. Otherwise you may find yourself in the woods wearing a less than fashionable cap from Dollar General.

Morning of day three arrived crisp and clear. The viewing window in my tent’s rainfly had frosted over and there were icicles hanging from the tent poles, but I had stayed warm enough for a good night’s sleep. After a quick breakfast of oatmeal and Advil, I was ready to break camp and tackle the final 5 miles back to the car. By now, most of the food was gone and my pack was nearly as light as Bill’s was when he started, so hiking would be easier.

This final stretch is shared by both the North and South Loop of the Shawnee Backpack trail. Much of the route parallels State Rt. 125 and the vehicle noise detracts from the “wilderness feel” the rest of the trail provides. Despite the occasional sound intrusion, the trail remains scenic with stretches along a stream and views of Turkey Creek Lake before dropping out of the woods, to the car and the two hour ride back to Cincinnati.

Crunching through dry leaves, we didn’t spot much wildlife, though deer and turkey are prevalent and even bear are spotted on occasion. Traveling earlier in the season would have resulted in more wildlife sightings, but less of the grand vistas opened up by the leaf drop.

The Shawnee State Forest Backpack Loops are seriously challenging and should not be taken lightly. The trail is long, rugged, steep and secluded. Having potable water and a latrine at each camp area is a nice touch though. The trail is a great adventure unto itself, but could also serve as a good trial hike for those contemplating a significant mountain backpack trip. As the Guidebook mentioned before says, be prepared for a strenuous, arduous struggle. Bring plenty of gorp, it will be fun!

Ohio State brochure on the trail

 

4 thoughts on “Backpacking the “Little Smokies” (Part 2)”

  1. Thanks for the write up. Me and buddy plan to do the 40-mile loop at the end of October.

    This will be our third major hike. Last year we did knobstone trail which had similar elevation.

    On day 1 we plan to go from Trailhead to camp 3 = 17.7 miles
    On day 2 camp 3 to camp 6 = 12.8 miles
    On day 3 camp 6 to trail head = 12.2

    I have the brochure map but is the roughest elevation between trailhead and camp 3? Will be fresh that day and rearing to go at the crack of dawn.

    1. There is definitely some significant elevation changes on that first stretch, some of the steepest of the entire trail. My biggest concern going that time of year would be running out of daylight trying to cover nearly 18 miles. You may want to keep camp 2 in mind as a fallback if you don’t cover the early miles quick enough for your schedule. Good luck!

    1. On the JMT I used both the John Muir Trail Pocket Atlas (BlackwoodsPress.com) and the Guthook phone App. They both had pretty good info for on-the-trail usage.
      This will sound like a commercial, but interestingly enough, I’m about to come out with a new book. “Backpacking’s Triple Crown: The Junior Version” will have a recap of my hikes on the JMT, Long Trail and the Colorado Trail. There will also be some info on the pros and cons of each trail. I hope to have it available on Amazon by May 1st.

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