Tag Archives: Tar Hollow

Trail Report: Logan Trail at Tar Hollow State Forest, South Loop

Bill, a former co-worker and fellow backpacker and I were trying to plan a short November trip, but the weather doesn’t always want to cooperate at that time of year in Ohio. However, since I wanted to test a new winter tent (Sierra Designs Convert 2), the forecast of rain turning to snow, high wind and a low in the mid-20s wasn’t a deterrent.

We would be hiking the backpack trail at Tar Hollow State Forest. It was pouring rain on the drive out, so a second breakfast at McDonalds was in order. The delay ended up giving us a bit under six hours of light to hike the 10 or so miles we had planned.

Despite the touristy name, Tar Hollow’s trails are fairly rugged for the Midwest. They meander through both 600 acre Tar Hollow State Park and the larger, surrounding Tar Hollow State Forest (16,000+acres). Located in Ross, Vinton and Hocking Counties, east of Chillicothe, Tar Hollow is a rugged landscape originally named after the pine tar pulled from the native pines growing there. The park is not as developed as your typical State Park but does offer a 15 acre lake, trails and a few camping options.

The Logan Trail is a backpack trail which is laid out in a pattern resembling a figure eight. The only trailside camping permitted is within the state park near the center of the eight and a large fire tower. The area consists of five small campsites that share a latrine. There is no potable water at the camp area.

Stopping at the park office we paid the $4/person/night fee for the “backcountry” camping. There are two trailheads typically used by hikers. In an effort to keep things simple and easy, we began from the fire tower as a light rain continued to fall.

Of the two loops, the southern spent more time in the forest and less in the park, so south it would be. Trail intel gleaned from the Interweb stated the trail was marked significantly better if hiking in a counter-clockwise direction, so that’s the way we went. This trail was originally constructed by the Boy Scouts. It is generally maintained well and marked well, but don’t expect to see a switchback. Several sections have been maintained through the use of a small bulldozer however, and were not quite the immersion in nature a singletrack trail provides.

The two loops run together for a bit less than ½ mile, then the South loop splits off. A drop and a few subsequent climbs made me wish that the word switchback had been in the builder’s vocabulary. With the ongoing rain, the slopes were slick. It’s not often a trail is steep enough that I feel I’m hiking face to face with it, but that was the case in a few spots.

Creek crossings were numerous, but even with the rain, were not typically tough to cross. The late fall color was still pretty good and although wet, the scenery was ruggedly beautiful.

Bill trying out Umbrella Hiking

There was one spot where the trail marking failed us. Nearly five miles in, we were walking on a ridgetop on what appeared to be an old service road. An obvious trail, blazed in red, dropped off the ridge. There were no blazes or signs in sight continuing straight, so we followed the blazes. It was one of the steepest drops of the trail and the maintenance level dropped as well, but it continued to be well blazed. After a half hour the forest opened into a meadow that was obviously the Camp Dulen Boy Scout Camp. We were a mile off the main trail. A posted map showed the camp at the end of a loop, so rather than backtrack, we continued onward.

This was quite possibly a mistake as the trail degraded significantly. It seemed as if this portion of the trail had been abandoned. Where the trail “disappeared,” we navigated from one faded blaze to the next until we reached a better maintenance level in time to reclimb the steep slope.

On the plus side, the rain had quit by the time we were back on the main trail. We walked right by our mistaken turn and were reassured that it was poor marking, and not our poor navigation that resulted in our detour. However, the side trip cost us an extra two miles, conditions had slowed us a bit, and with the late start, we ended up hiking in the dark. Despite having to deal with the remains of some timbercutting in the dark, we arrived at the designated camp area without any other issues.

As no one else was enjoying the Tar Hollow camp experience, we had our choice of spots on the ridge and found a nice flat area (area 124) without any standing water or apparent widow makers.

The rain had quit, replaced by occasional showers of ice pellets while we set up our tents by headlamp. The “test” tent went up quickly and my sleeping bag, pack and all my gear fit in with room to spare. The large doorway was waterproof when closed, so my decision to leave the removable vestibule at home was a good one.  I christened the tent, The Palace. For a full review of the tent, check here.

The Palace

There was plenty of firewood in the area, but it was all wet. One plus to having a vehicle nearby was we had brought a little dry wood. This starter supply was enough to get a warm blaze going well enough that careful feeding of the damp wood continued to keep the flames strong. The vehicle also served as a cache for extra water (and other liquids).

We kept a fire going for a while after dinner, but eventually the increasing wind, dropping temperature and ice pellet showers drove us to our respective tents. Since I’d be needing every bit of my 23 degree bag’s warming power, I kept The Palace zipped up tight with the foot area venting closed. It would be a good test of the material’s winter weather breathability.

Night’s are long in November, but I slept through the night, warm and dry. Despite the wind, the Convert’s fly remained taut and quiet. The temperature was in the mid 20s by morning. In Bill’s tent, his water froze. Mine did not. In addition, I had no issues with condensation whatsoever. For cold weather camping, the Convert was an impressive tent.

In the morning, the sky was clear but the cold front had done it’s job. Bill’s socks, which had gotten wet on a creek crossing, were frozen solid. He was able to send of photo of them to his son for his enjoyment. We hiked a few more miles in the park, just to explore a bit then headed back in time to watch a little football.

Trail Info

Logan Trail is located in Tar Hollow State Park and Forest, near Chillicothe. Head east from town on US 50 for less than ten miles to State Rt 327 North. Ten more miles will bring you to the Entrance to Tar Hollow State Park. Camp permits are available at the camp office and signs can direct you to the fire tower.

The South Loop is approximately 9 miles long if you don’t visit Camp Dulen. Per my Garmin, the elevation varied between 680 feet to 1,270 feet. The South Loop is generally rolling with two major drops and climbs of 400+ ft (three if you make the wrong turn). There were several creek crossings, but, even with recent rain, none were overly difficult.

Overall, the South Loop of Logan Trail provides a relatively challenging hike with some beautiful forested scenery. Unlike the nearby trails of Hocking Hills though, there is no need to worry about crowds.